Tales from the Script: Hollywood Screenwriters Share Their Stories - - Nonfiction Book & Film Project About Screenwriting

Today when I was scrolling through some things on Netflix I saw this title and remembered watching it years ago. It’s fantastic. It’s a must-see for every aspiring screenwriter. 

Note to writers:
Recently I was approached by a nice young woman who wanted to ask me some questions about publishing. She was courteous and pleasant and it was wonderful spending time with someone who is excited about her work. 
I’m always happy to answer questions and talk to people about writing but I’m also very surprised when I hear a lot of the same questions. Surprised, because there is so much information on the Internet these days. And it’s so simple. Just Google it. So I’m here to encourage all of you out there who are curious about how to find an agent, how to get published, who is publishing what type of work, etc. Just Google it. Do you want to know the best way to write a query? Do you need to know how to format your manuscript? It’s all out there, all you have to do is have a working knowledge of how your computer functions. Do a search. Better yet, do several searches and if everyone is saying the same thing than you’re probably on the right track. 
Along with hundreds or thousands of informative sites on publishing there are probably that many books on writing, publishing, agents, how to market yourself, etc. 
The one thing you will need to know, however, from someone who has gone the route of publishing traditionally (getting paid an advance and being represented by a publishing company with a good distribution history, one that also pays royalties) is that if you are going to get an agent be careful. Get references from others who have been represented by that agent and never, ever pay an agent to place your book with a publisher. Ever. If they ask for payment to cover printing costs that’s okay. But they work for you and only get paid when they place your book. They work on commission. Also, study and research how publishing contracts work. If you have a good agent they should be looking out for your best interests and they should negotiate terms for you. But it is ultimately up to you, the author, to understand the terms of your contract. So please, do your research. 

Note to writers:

Recently I was approached by a nice young woman who wanted to ask me some questions about publishing. She was courteous and pleasant and it was wonderful spending time with someone who is excited about her work. 

I’m always happy to answer questions and talk to people about writing but I’m also very surprised when I hear a lot of the same questions. Surprised, because there is so much information on the Internet these days. And it’s so simple. Just Google it. So I’m here to encourage all of you out there who are curious about how to find an agent, how to get published, who is publishing what type of work, etc. Just Google it. Do you want to know the best way to write a query? Do you need to know how to format your manuscript? It’s all out there, all you have to do is have a working knowledge of how your computer functions. Do a search. Better yet, do several searches and if everyone is saying the same thing than you’re probably on the right track. 

Along with hundreds or thousands of informative sites on publishing there are probably that many books on writing, publishing, agents, how to market yourself, etc. 

The one thing you will need to know, however, from someone who has gone the route of publishing traditionally (getting paid an advance and being represented by a publishing company with a good distribution history, one that also pays royalties) is that if you are going to get an agent be careful. Get references from others who have been represented by that agent and never, ever pay an agent to place your book with a publisher. Ever. If they ask for payment to cover printing costs that’s okay. But they work for you and only get paid when they place your book. They work on commission. Also, study and research how publishing contracts work. If you have a good agent they should be looking out for your best interests and they should negotiate terms for you. But it is ultimately up to you, the author, to understand the terms of your contract. So please, do your research. 

http://charnelhouse.tripod.com/fulldarknostars.html

Last week I went to Los Angeles to welcome my daughter home from Japan. As she was sleeping off jet lag I sat in a hotel and read Full Dark no Stars, a Stephen King book recommended by my brother. It is a compilation of short stories and I’m always intrigued by the idea that SK can take a very “simple” idea and weave a story around it. His brilliance is in character development and exploring all of the nuances of the human experience. 

I wish I had remembered to write down the things King wrote in the afterword. As a writer they resonated and made me think about my own writing. The one thing I do remember is that he said (paraphrasing) that there are things within all of us, things we aren’t even aware we are capable of doing. 

If you can get through the gore and horror this is a great book for writers to see how a master brilliantly crafts his tales. Read the afterword. Examine your own characters and ask yourself if you have reached far enough. 

Anonymous asked: Where is that trail you're hiking on? I'm in the same area and want some new places to try out.

It’s very close to WSU in Pullman. I think we only traveled about ten or fifteen minutes from the campus to get there. It’s called Kamiak Butte.

For more info on hiking in the area check the following:

http://democratherald.com/news/state-and-regional/april-is-a-delicious-time-for-northwest-hiking/article_a4ceae8e-a48d-5298-8017-acfbdc894235.html

Rewarding my girl for a job well done. 

Rewarding my girl for a job well done. 

I wouldn’t say there are any perfect training days but today was as close as it gets. After a lot of work teaching Khyssie to stand tied she finally seems to understand. She stood quietly waiting for me to get her tack together, she didn’t fidget or paw, and she was respectful and obedient when we tried out our newly refurbished outdoor arena! 
I’m so thrilled. The footing in our arena last year was hard packed and it contributed to a lot of tripping when Khyssie was moving beyond a walk. Now it’s cushy and rather deep (the barn owner hauled in about five truckloads of coarse sand) but that also means it takes more energy to move through. Not a bad thing even if it showed Khyssie’s more clumsy side. She had to think about picking up her feet and it didn’t take long for her to work up a sweat. She’s going to be in great shape in no time!
After I walked and trotted her in the arena I got off and decided it would be best to lunge her at the lope before attempting it from the saddle. This was a whole new experience. That deep sand feels so strange! For some reason she thought by moving faster she would be able to power through it all but eventually, and probably because she was tired, she slowed down and started moving off of her rear end. 
There are a couple of areas I will work on tomorrow. Collection and a steady gait. She slows down, speeds, up, fiddles with her bit, and still has yet to master the relaxed, even pace I’m hoping for. All in good time. 

I wouldn’t say there are any perfect training days but today was as close as it gets. After a lot of work teaching Khyssie to stand tied she finally seems to understand. She stood quietly waiting for me to get her tack together, she didn’t fidget or paw, and she was respectful and obedient when we tried out our newly refurbished outdoor arena! 

I’m so thrilled. The footing in our arena last year was hard packed and it contributed to a lot of tripping when Khyssie was moving beyond a walk. Now it’s cushy and rather deep (the barn owner hauled in about five truckloads of coarse sand) but that also means it takes more energy to move through. Not a bad thing even if it showed Khyssie’s more clumsy side. She had to think about picking up her feet and it didn’t take long for her to work up a sweat. She’s going to be in great shape in no time!

After I walked and trotted her in the arena I got off and decided it would be best to lunge her at the lope before attempting it from the saddle. This was a whole new experience. That deep sand feels so strange! For some reason she thought by moving faster she would be able to power through it all but eventually, and probably because she was tired, she slowed down and started moving off of her rear end. 

There are a couple of areas I will work on tomorrow. Collection and a steady gait. She slows down, speeds, up, fiddles with her bit, and still has yet to master the relaxed, even pace I’m hoping for. All in good time. 

thestorykeeper replied to your photoset “Then and now. First picture shows Khyssie as a yearling (around 18…”

Good mom, good horse-person, good writer… good book!!!
Aw. Thanks so much. :) 

This is the story of raising, training and loving a young horse named Khyssie.

I also explore the love of writing. Because I can't be out at the barn all the time.